RBS begins trial of card payments verified by fingerprint

Share on LinkedIn

 

 

rbs fingerprint

RBS has today put the first biometric fingerprint card issued by a UK bank into use.

The bank is piloting the technology with 200 customers as part of a three-month national trial.

Customers use their fingerprint to verify transactions above the £30 contactless limit, increasing security and making it easier to pay for goods or services.

The card can be used as normal in ATMs, the post office and for digital banking. It works with existing contactless and Chip and Pin terminals, meaning shops will be able to accept payments without updating their technology.

The fingerprint can be registered in a customer’s home using new technology. Once locked onto a card, it cannot be changed. The fingerprint is only held on the card and not centrally by the bank. Each transaction is verified using data which is encrypted and stored on the card.

RBS head of payments David Crawford said: “We are using the very latest technology across our business to make banking easier for our customers and biometric fingerprint cards are one of the many technologies we are exploring further.

“This is the biggest development in card technology in recent years and it’s great to finally see the cards in the hands of our customers.”

Royal Bank is working with digital security company Gemalto , part of Thales, and Visa on the service.

Howard Berg, senior vice president, UK Ireland and Switzerland, of Gemalto, said: “Biometric authentication and identification is set to transform financial services and we’re proud to be leading the way in this field alongside our partners.”

Jeni Mundy, managing director, UK & Ireland, Visa, said: “This technology has the potential to make the lives of consumers easier and provides greater choice to confirm their identity. At Visa we’re committed to working with partners to develop and invest in emerging capabilities that deliver a better, more secure payment experience for consumers.”

Re-disseminated by SINGFIN